Tag Archives: Anterior Cruciate Liagments in dogs

Pets At the Vets – The Torn Cruciate Ligament

18 Sep

When our three and one-half year old Golden Retriever returned from her afternoon play day with her sister, Maddie, we knew something was not quite right. At the park, they had been surrounded by best dog bud Dylan, pals Ziggie, Murphy, Jada, Jada’s six month old sister, Zolie, and the usual secret dog park romp. However Casey was favoring her right rear leg ever so slightly. We inspected. No touch or pressure sensitivity to the right rear leg or paw. By morning she seemed fine. She’s okay, we signed with relief.
Next play date, same thing. Within a few moments after returning home post park roughhousing with the buds, Casey ever so slightly favored her right hear paw. Again. So again we got down on the floor with her to inspect, palpate, move the joints, feel for burrs or stones between the pads of her paws. Nothing. By morning she exhibited no limp.
This went on for several weeks. Then without our seeing or even hearing any demonstrable event that signaled a totally torn cruciate ligament, she did not stop favoring the leg by morning… or afternoon… or evening.  In fact, she was not putting much weight on her right rear leg at all. Something was terribly wrong.
Our dog body-work guru came to work on our oldest boy, Felix, when she took one look at Casey’s limp and urged us to take her to the local veterinary surgical center for an evaluation. Wisely, she did not even want to touch Casey’s paw (as if Casey would have let her by then). Because our dog wellness guru, Bettina Lally, was so attuned to dogs, she recognized immediately and knew what had to be done.
Bottom line: Casey had torn her Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) just as I had torn mine seven years earlier. What a small world, I thought. However I soon learned that a torn dog ACL is not as easy to repair. Unlike humans, I  read online, dog replacement ACLs did not take.
We wanted to make sure we found the best and most experienced orthopedic sugeon to give our gal the best chance for a full recovery to her previous self. After all, she had just completed her very first Blue Ribbon Agility Run and loved competing.  Since she loved the weave poles, a frames, teeter-totter, and cone runs, we hoped to be able to allow her once again to do what she so loved.
Thus we found the Southern California ACL “Go To” guy, Dr. Adam Gassel, DVM, of the Irvine Regional Animal Emergency Hospital, in Irvine, California. After x-rays, his diagnosis was serious.
Fully torn, it would require immediate surgery to repair if she were to have any hope of recovering to her former self.
Since we had anticipated this, we had refrained from allowing her food or liquids after midnight. Good thing.
While we left our girl in good hands, we were fully cognizant of all the many things that could go wrong during a general anesthesia procedure. She was to have what they called the TPLO for treatment of a ruptured cruciate ligament.#